Bridgetown Jarrah Park

Bridgetown Jarrah Park is located 20 kilometres from Bridgetown along the Brockman Highway. The park includes four walks of varying lengths, from 20 minutes to 3 hours. The trails meander past a variety of plant communities. In spring the forest floor is lit up by a brilliant kaleidoscope of colour provided by an array of wildflowers. Follow the labelled junction numbers for each of the trails. Alternatively, you can walk the trails in any direction and use the junction numbers to get your bearings. This way you can make your walk as long or as short as you like. 

The area is significant as the uplands support open forest of jarrah and marri while the valley vegetation ranges from open yarri (also known as WA blackbutt), marri and jarrah to full open forest of karri with a wide range of understorey plant communities. This is the northernmost occurrence of Karri and the only place where magnificent specimens of the four major tree species of the region can be seen within easy walking distance. 

 

 
Choose your TRAIL

Jarrah Park

Shield Tree Trail - 20 min

Fallers Brand Trail - 75 min

Hollow Karri Trail - 2 hours

Blackbutt Trail - 3 hours

There are four trails in the Bridgetown Jarrah Park including the Shield Tree Trail (700m), Fallers Brand Trail (3.6km), Hollow Karri Trail (4.2km) and Blackbutt Trail (6.5km).

 

Bridgetown Jarrah Park is located in State Forest 20 minutes drive from Bridgetown towards Nannup along the Brockman Hwy. This forest once echoed to the sounds of axe and crosscut saws, but now is a peaceful setting in which to contemplate the lives and experience  of our early timber workers and the forest which supported them.

 

Nestled among the hills between the picturesque towns of Nannup and Bridgetown, the 340 ha park is a joint achievement of the communities of Bridgetown and Greenbushes and Department of Conservation.

 

There are four trails that wander through the park where you can discover the intimate character of the jarrah forest. The trails commemorate important innovations in the early days of managing the south-west's forests.

In spring the forest is lit up by a kaleidescope of colour provided by an array of wildflowers including native wisteria, yellow flags, wattles, hovea, banksias, coral vine and many orchids.

 

 

Facilities

Bushwalking

Toilets available

​Picnic tables available

Parking is available

© 2016 by Paper Napkin Creative. All rights reserved.